Posts tagged bbc

Soccer fans ordered to stop sharing goals on Vine

The English Premier League’s Director of Communications Dan Johnson has told the BBC that they intend to crack down on unauthorized sharing on goal footage from soccer games. “You can understand that fans see something, they can capture it, they can share it,” Johnson said. “But ultimately it is against the law.”

“I know it sounds as if we’re killjoys but we have to protect our intellectual property.”

The real question is: will they come for our gifs next?

Looking for clues in the brand-new ‘Doctor Who’ trailer
There’s a new teaser trailer for the eighth season of Doctor Who, and it looks like it may include a reference to one of the Doctor’s greatest enemies.

Photo via doctor-who-screencaps/Tumblr

Looking for clues in the brand-new ‘Doctor Who’ trailer

There’s a new teaser trailer for the eighth season of Doctor Who, and it looks like it may include a reference to one of the Doctor’s greatest enemies.

Photo via doctor-who-screencaps/Tumblr

BBC confirms 'Sherlock' news with #221back

Say what you like about Sherlock, but that show really does know how to work with its audience.

On Tuesday afternoon, BBC One posted a couple of cryptic tweets tagged #221back (a reference to Sherlock’s address, 221B Baker Street), and that was enough to send Sherlockians into a flurry of excitement. What could it all mean?

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The role-playing game is on for “Sherlock” fans

It may be months before fans of BBC’s Sherlock see anything of the show’s long-awaited third series, but the anticipation has proven inspiring for one group of fans. Sherlock: the Game is a recently announced fandom-wide project that aims to write, animate, code, and distribute a full online RPG to Sherlock fans, all completely free.

Sherlock: the Game begins, of course, in 221B Baker Street. The starting concept for the game revolves around a month in the life of John Watson. The object? Keep Sherlock’s boredom meter from getting dangerously high by solving crimes—and keep your own money meter from getting too low.

While players will be playing as John, the game contains an impressively large cast of pixelized characters, known as “sprites,” based on the BBC show’s ensemble.

The project scope is impressive as well: what started as a two-person project has grown into a full-blown game production calling for at least 20 writers, pixel artists, puzzle designers, sound designers, and illustrators—and possibly more as the game continues to grow.

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Chris Shaw draws bad portraits of British celebrities and tweets it to them to see if they respond. This one of BBC News anchor Huw Edwardses got no response but I got a good chuckle out of it.

Chris Shaw draws bad portraits of British celebrities and tweets it to them to see if they respond. This one of BBC News anchor Huw Edwardses got no response but I got a good chuckle out of it.

"Sherlock" vs. "Elementary" debate leads to Tumblr tag wars and fandom bickering

Over the last 120 years, legendary detective Sherlock Holmes has been recreated as a cartoon mouse, seen his best friend programmed into the mind of an android, turned gay, had a female assistant, and been modernized as a black detective in urban New York.

But never, until CBS’s new series, Elementary, has Holmes’ friend Dr. Watson been transformed into an Asian-American woman—Joan Watson, played by Lucy Liu.

Numerous factors connect Elementary to the popular BBC mini-series Sherlock, a work of modern-day Holmes fanfiction from Doctor Who showrunner Steven Moffat. Unfortunately, the links between the shows have painted a target on Elementary’s back, and fans of the BBC’s Sherlock are trashing the CBS show (and its supporters) online before the first episode has even aired.

CBS originally asked Moffat to do a stateside revamp of his hit. When Moffat refused, CBS greenlit their own Holmes remake. Moffat wasn’t pleased, and said so numerous times, calling the U.S. version a “completely unrelated rogue version of Sherlock,” despite the fact that the same accusation could easily be made of his own version—or any version—relative to the original stories by Arthur Conan Doyle.

In another brain-breaking connection, the actor playing the U.S. Sherlock is Jonny Lee Miller, who shared an Olivier award with the U.K. Sherlock, Benedict Cumberbatch, for their dual turns in Danny Boyle’s popular production of Frankenstein. On stage last fall, Cumberbatch and Miller alternated roles as the mad scientist and the monster.

Cumberbatch didn’t help matters, telling Shortlist magazine he felt Miller took the job for the paycheck (he later claimed he was misquoted), and adding to TV Line that he was “frightened of the dynamic of male friendship that you’d lose. Because that is obviously the bedrock of the books as well. There might be sexual tension between Joan [Watson] and Sherlock.”

The overt antagonism of the Sherlock cast and crew has bled over into the fandom. Sherlock fans have ranted about Elementary for months, even though it doesn’t air until September 27.

Fans’ primary complaint—though there are plenty of minor ones—is that casting a woman in the role of Watson will inevitably lead to a romantic subplot between Watson and Holmes, thus both highlighting and invalidating a century and a half of queer subtext between Holmes and Watson. Though “JohnLock” shippers—fans who want to see a relationship between Holmes and John Watson—aren’t the first to pick up on this subtext, they’re certainly the loudest.
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"Sherlock" vs. "Elementary" debate leads to Tumblr tag wars and fandom bickering

Over the last 120 years, legendary detective Sherlock Holmes has been recreated as a cartoon mouse, seen his best friend programmed into the mind of an android, turned gay, had a female assistant, and been modernized as a black detective in urban New York.

But never, until CBS’s new series, Elementary, has Holmes’ friend Dr. Watson been transformed into an Asian-American woman—Joan Watson, played by Lucy Liu.

Numerous factors connect Elementary to the popular BBC mini-series Sherlock, a work of modern-day Holmes fanfiction from Doctor Who showrunner Steven Moffat. Unfortunately, the links between the shows have painted a target on Elementary’s back, and fans of the BBC’s Sherlock are trashing the CBS show (and its supporters) online before the first episode has even aired.

CBS originally asked Moffat to do a stateside revamp of his hit. When Moffat refused, CBS greenlit their own Holmes remake. Moffat wasn’t pleased, and said so numerous times, calling the U.S. version a “completely unrelated rogue version of Sherlock,” despite the fact that the same accusation could easily be made of his own version—or any version—relative to the original stories by Arthur Conan Doyle.

In another brain-breaking connection, the actor playing the U.S. Sherlock is Jonny Lee Miller, who shared an Olivier award with the U.K. Sherlock, Benedict Cumberbatch, for their dual turns in Danny Boyle’s popular production of Frankenstein. On stage last fall, Cumberbatch and Miller alternated roles as the mad scientist and the monster.

Cumberbatch didn’t help matters, telling Shortlist magazine he felt Miller took the job for the paycheck (he later claimed he was misquoted), and adding to TV Line that he was “frightened of the dynamic of male friendship that you’d lose. Because that is obviously the bedrock of the books as well. There might be sexual tension between Joan [Watson] and Sherlock.”

The overt antagonism of the Sherlock cast and crew has bled over into the fandom. Sherlock fans have ranted about Elementary for months, even though it doesn’t air until September 27.

Fans’ primary complaint—though there are plenty of minor ones—is that casting a woman in the role of Watson will inevitably lead to a romantic subplot between Watson and Holmes, thus both highlighting and invalidating a century and a half of queer subtext between Holmes and Watson. Though “JohnLock” shippers—fans who want to see a relationship between Holmes and John Watson—aren’t the first to pick up on this subtext, they’re certainly the loudest.
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The BBC thinks your summer wasn’t particularly impressive.

The BBC thinks your summer wasn’t particularly impressive.

Here’s a video of Prince Charles delivering the weather in Scotland. He seems smarter than about 95 percent of the meteorologists at the Weather Channel. AMIRITEORWUT?

-Jordan