Posts tagged censorship

Google blocked in China ahead of Tiananmen massacre anniversary

Obstruction of Google services are believed to be part of a massive government effort to stifle conversation around the Tiananmen Square massacre which occurred on June 3 and 4, 1989, during which at least several hundred protesters were killed by the Chinese military.

The so-called “Incident”—launched in part to protest inflation, limited career prospects, and govenrment corruption—has since been disguised as a “counterrevolutionary riot” by the Chinese government, and hidden from new generations of Chinese.

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Britain: Don't forget that your Internet access may be censored.

bookshop:

Parent calls cops on teen for giving free books away at a free book giveaway
So, this happened: Someone called the cops on a teenager for giving away free books.
At—wait for it—a book giveaway event.
Just last week, we wrote about the difficulties Sherman Alexie’s acclaimed Young Adult novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, had faced during its four-year-run as one of the most banned books in the U.S.
Two weeks ago, parents in the Idaho school district of Meridian successfully campaigned to remove Alexie’s novel from its 10th-grade reading curriculum and additional reading lists.
Wednesday night, irate parents literally called the cops to the scene where Meridian teens were passing out free copies of Alexie’s novel. Boise news station KBOI reported that even the cops were baffled about why they’d been asked to police a book giveaway.
A National Book Award-winner, The Absolutely True Diary is a searing coming-of-age story about a Native American teenager who decides to attend an all-white high school outside of his reservation. It’s a powerful narrative about modern race relations in the U.S. But the Meridian school board sided with parents who objected to its alleged sexual and anti-Christian content, along with, as noted by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, other stuff:

[A]n adult named Lonnie Stiles complained that the Alexie novel contains language “we do not speak in our home.”

Apparently the adults who objected to the book weren’t thinking about the teens living on Idaho’s five Native American reservations. 
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bookshop:

Parent calls cops on teen for giving free books away at a free book giveaway

So, this happened: Someone called the cops on a teenager for giving away free books.

At—wait for it—a book giveaway event.

Just last week, we wrote about the difficulties Sherman Alexie’s acclaimed Young Adult novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, had faced during its four-year-run as one of the most banned books in the U.S.

Two weeks ago, parents in the Idaho school district of Meridian successfully campaigned to remove Alexie’s novel from its 10th-grade reading curriculum and additional reading lists.

Wednesday night, irate parents literally called the cops to the scene where Meridian teens were passing out free copies of Alexie’s novel. Boise news station KBOI reported that even the cops were baffled about why they’d been asked to police a book giveaway.

A National Book Award-winner, The Absolutely True Diary is a searing coming-of-age story about a Native American teenager who decides to attend an all-white high school outside of his reservation. It’s a powerful narrative about modern race relations in the U.S. But the Meridian school board sided with parents who objected to its alleged sexual and anti-Christian content, along with, as noted by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, other stuff:

[A]n adult named Lonnie Stiles complained that the Alexie novel contains language “we do not speak in our home.”

Apparently the adults who objected to the book weren’t thinking about the teens living on Idaho’s five Native American reservations

[READ MORE]

For young women in China, slash fanfiction is a dangerous hobby

The UK's new "porn filters" are already causing nothing but trouble. Here's how to bypass them.

What does the Trans-Pacific Partnership leak mean for the Internet?

On Wednesday, seemingly out of nowhere, WikiLeaks released a portion of the biggest, most secretive, most controversial pending trade agreement in the world: the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Internet advocates of all stripes, from the intellectual property experts at the Electronic Frontier Foundation to people who don’t mind getting arrested for climbing government buildings to make TPP-related poop jokes, had been clamoring for that moment since 2011.

The TPP’s controversy stems from three factors. It’s huge: 12 countries, including the U.S. and parts of Latin America and Asia, are trying to agree to the same terms on a wide range of business and trade practices. It’s secretive: like any trade agreement, the details of negotiations are kept from the public, though the TPP’s been heavy handed about how it keeps out journalists and public advocates. And the process itself is biased: the only people given access to government negotiators are corporate lobbyists.

Tuesday’s leak was the most recent draft of the Intellectual property chapter, which deals with copyright and how that’s enforced online. It’s the first time anyone has seen the chapter since a 2011 leak, which included provisions that led Internet freedom activists to call it “the biggest global threat to the Internet since ACTA.”

The Daily Dot spoke with EFF Global Policy Analyst Maira Sutton about decoding the newest draft.

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This morning, as Tumblr users learned that some of their blogs and many tags were being blocked or obscured, I emailed Tumblr about the changes. A rep finally wrote back with a total nonresponse.

This morning, as Tumblr users learned that some of their blogs and many tags were being blocked or obscured, I emailed Tumblr about the changes. A rep finally wrote back with a total nonresponse.

Jordan's censorship law blacks out nearly 300 news sites