Posts tagged guide

It’s hard to be an entrepreneur and make money on Etsy, but thanks to Shark Tank and The Profit on CNBC we’ve got a few tips to help make your Esty shop profitable. 
12 tips for successful selling on Etsy
Reblog with your own suggestions and you could win a Shark Tank or The Profit prize pack!

It’s hard to be an entrepreneur and make money on Etsy, but thanks to Shark Tank and The Profit on CNBC we’ve got a few tips to help make your Esty shop profitable. 

12 tips for successful selling on Etsy

Reblog with your own suggestions and you could win a Shark Tank or The Profit prize pack!

A fandom guide to Dylan O'Brien, the most popular actor you've never heard of

Prior to the launch of MTV’s Teen Wolf in 2011, Dylan O’Brien was famous for, well… nothing. During high school, he posted a few funny YouTubevideos where he did things like lip synch to Spice Girls songs, but we’re not talking Vlogbrothers-style celebrity status here. 

When he was cast as Stiles Stilinski in Teen Wolf, he hadn’t so much as played “teen boy #3” in the background of another TV show. And yet, it only took a handful of episodes for him to shine out as the definitive star of the show. 

At 1.1 million followers, his Twitter account is more popular than Tom Hiddleston’s. In 2013, he was the sixth most reblogged actor on Tumblr, just behind Benedict Cumberbatch, Matt Smith, and the three main cast members of Supernatural—the unbeatable Superwholock trifecta. So, considering the fact that he’s never starred in anything anywhere near as famous as Doctor Who or a Marvel movie, how did he become the most popular actor you’ve never heard of?

Future Academy Award-winner Dylan O’Brien

It’s easy to assume that when Tumblr teens say they like a TV star for his skills as an actor, it’s akin to someone saying that they read Playboy for the articles. The thing is, with Dylan O’Brien, being a fan of his acting is a completely legitimate claim. Sure, he may look like a luminous cross between Bambi and a member of One Direction, but his acting is what really sets him apart from the crowd. Everyone on Teen Wolf is as cute as a button (or as ripped as a Calvin Klein model), but you don’t see them receiving the kind of manic attention that’s currently reserved for Dylan O’Brien.

 

GIF via dekkers/Tumblr

You know when you discover the existence of some weird role an A-list star took on before they were famous? As in, did Jennifer Aniston really star in a horror movie called Leprechaun? Did Elijah Wood seriously make aNational Dairy Board PSA on the health-giving properties of cheese? What, exactly, led George Clooney to end up credited as “lip-syncing transvestite” in a 1992 movie about organ harvesting?

For Dylan O’Brien, Teen Wolf’s Stiles Stilinski is that role.

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When your favorite shows are on hiatus or the latest blockbuster movie turns out to be a flop, that’s when summer fandoms come into play. And this year’s summer fandom is NBC’s Hannibal.

Summer fandoms are like one-hit wonders. Most of them stick around for a few months and then vanish without trace, but occasionally you end up with the equivalent of that one party tune you just can’t get out of your head: ubiquitous, popular, and inexplicably long-lived. Last year’s summer craze, Teen Wolf, has now engulfed the 90 percent of Tumblr that isn’t porn (plus some of the 10 percent that is), but it’s the exception. Most summer fandoms are a passing fad, and only time will tell if Hannibal makes the cut. 

For now, let’s take a look at some of the reasons why Tumblr can’t shut up about a TV show about cannibalism.

When your favorite shows are on hiatus or the latest blockbuster movie turns out to be a flop, that’s when summer fandoms come into play. And this year’s summer fandom is NBC’s Hannibal.

Summer fandoms are like one-hit wonders. Most of them stick around for a few months and then vanish without trace, but occasionally you end up with the equivalent of that one party tune you just can’t get out of your head: ubiquitous, popular, and inexplicably long-lived. Last year’s summer craze, Teen Wolf, has now engulfed the 90 percent of Tumblr that isn’t porn (plus some of the 10 percent that is), but it’s the exception. Most summer fandoms are a passing fad, and only time will tell if Hannibal makes the cut.

For now, let’s take a look at some of the reasons why Tumblr can’t shut up about a TV show about cannibalism.

A step-by-step GIF guide to GIFing everything you see

NOTE: Click here to see the original story with higher quality GIFs.

GIFs rule the Internet, and you’re never gonna survive out there if you’re incapable of whipping together on a moment’s notice a four-second animation of Jason Kidd’s game-winning three-point shot or a happy corgi running on a sidewalk.

If you’re equipped with Photoshop, there are plenty of GIF-making guides out there—but none of them (as far as we can tell) use GIFs themselves to show you how to make them. And that’s just silly. GIFs are the best way to explain anything, ever—whether it’s Election Day, Thanksgiving, or McKayla Maroney’s silver-medal vault.

Ready, class? This is going to be fun. These are the steps I used to teach my own parents, and now they’re pros. But before we start, you’ll need two things: a YouTube video (preferably of a Jack Russell puppy) and the DownloadHelper extension on Firefox. (I still can’t find a Chrome extension I like; if you have a recommendation, let me know!)

OK, got it? Here we go.

1) Use DownloadHelper to save a video

Just click on those little balloons or atoms or whatever they are.

2) Open Photoshop and Import

Select “Import Frames to Layers” under the File menu. Then select the video you just ripped.

3) Select which part of the video you want

The shorter the better. GIFs have to be small so they can load on your page!

See the option that says “Limit to every [ __ ] frames”? Play around with that. The higher the number, the lower the frame rate, and the faster and choppier your video will be. Try it with 2, 3, or 4.

Note: If you increase this number, you’ll have to make each frame longer to keep your animation at its normal speed.

It’ll look like this when it’s imported:

4) Adjust the length of each frame

If your GIF is limited to every two frames, try changing 0.02 seconds to 0.04. If it’s every four frames, try 0.08.

If you didn’t touch the frame rate, skip this step, fool.

5) Export the GIF

Click “Save for Web” under the File menu.

6) Adjust the size

Your ideal file size is 2 megabytes (or 1MB for Tumblr). If it’s too large, adjust your image size down to no lower than 300 pixels. Bigger is better, but if the GIF is going on Tumblr, 500 is as wide as you’ll need.

You can also play with the lossy and dither settings. The higher the lossy or the lower the dither, the grainier your image will be.

Don’t play with the color settings unless you want a really crappy-looking image; 256 colors should be fine.

7) Finally, save!

The result:

High-five yourself. You did it!

We like Imgur as a host for GIFs, but Minus, which accepts images up to 30 megabytes, is another good option. Upload your image, copy the URL, and spread like wildfire. Your life is about to get a whole lot Internet-ier.

What if I just want to make one on my iPhone?

Easy. There are tons of apps. I like GIFBoom and Loopcam. We’re also fans of Cinemagram.

Where can I find those awesome reaction GIFs?

Good question! Here are some excellent resources to bookmark:
-The Definitive Collection of High-Five GIFs
-Dog GIFs
-The 60 Best Breaking Bad GIFs
-Reddit’s favorite 700 GIFs
-A wonderfully well organized reaction GIFs archive
-The 121 Best Dancing GIFs of All Time
-Another collection, with more than 200

All right, you’re ready now. Go forth, friends. And dance. Dance!




Main photo by Cooper Fleishman. Dancing GIFs via Funny or Die/Tumblr. Tina Fey via Lovelyish.

The definitive guide to creepypasta—the Internet’s scariest urban legends

It’s Halloween, and what better time to dig out those classic spine-tingling urban legends to tell around the campfire? You know the ones—Smile.jpg, Slendy, the Black-Eyed Kids.

Oh, you don’t?

OK, so maybe in the age of the Internet, the campfire is now a virtual chat or IM. And maybe these chillers aren’t as well known as the typical ones about the couple making out in the woods or the curious incident of the dog in the microwave. But to countless numbers of horror-lovers on the Internet, these stories and more like them have spawned sleepless nights and viral storytelling—a whole new genre of horror known as creepypasta.

The term “creepypasta” (pronounced like the noodle) is a pun off of another Internet-spawned word, “copypasta,” a portmanteau of ‘copy/paste’ that probably grew life on 4chan. Copypasta refers to easily grabbable chunks of text, often no more than a few paragraphs, that get copied and pasted all over the Internet. Copypasta might take the form of Internet memes, text from email forwards, or fun stories to share with friends.

Creepypasta, on the other hand, is copypasta’s evil mirror, the spookier version of terrifying tales that end on the creepiest note possible—their horror often enhanced by their brevity, their journal-style format, or their casual, “here’s a creepy thing that happened to me once” narrative style. Though many creepypasta are no more than a paragraph or two long, often the stories will span many updates and branch off into varying multimedia formats. The term Creepypasta itself has likewise expanded, becoming a catch-all phrase to describe the Internet’s most scary, weird, and terrifying phenomena.

Much like other urban legends, Creepypasta reveals modern anxiety over technology, especially in regards to media and forms of communication. These are often malignant sources of evil, much as they are in Japanese horror films like Pulse or Ringu. In some instances, your TV set can be the entity that can turn on you. In others it’s an old computer. Perhaps it’s a video game purchased under mysterious circumstances. Often it’s a single cursed file with no known origin, as if it came from the bowels of hell and not the bowels of the Internet.

Creepypasta also often reveals a sense of deep distortion of reality, the kind of just-slightly-off view of the world that only comes from the collective imagination of 4channers, Something Awful goons, redditors, and others who’ve found themselves glued to their computer at 3am reading about Mothman, Chupacabra, or other modern-day monsters. It seems inevitable, in retrospect, that out of the twisting labyrinth of the Internet, new legends would emerge, entirely fabricated but instantly occupying the status of mythos: a cave with terrifying secrets; a bizarre house that compels its victims to document their own horrifying ends; a normal, everyday photo of children on a playground—with one glaring oddity.
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The definitive guide to creepypasta—the Internet’s scariest urban legends

It’s Halloween, and what better time to dig out those classic spine-tingling urban legends to tell around the campfire? You know the ones—Smile.jpg, Slendy, the Black-Eyed Kids.

Oh, you don’t?

OK, so maybe in the age of the Internet, the campfire is now a virtual chat or IM. And maybe these chillers aren’t as well known as the typical ones about the couple making out in the woods or the curious incident of the dog in the microwave. But to countless numbers of horror-lovers on the Internet, these stories and more like them have spawned sleepless nights and viral storytelling—a whole new genre of horror known as creepypasta.

The term “creepypasta” (pronounced like the noodle) is a pun off of another Internet-spawned word, “copypasta,” a portmanteau of ‘copy/paste’ that probably grew life on 4chan. Copypasta refers to easily grabbable chunks of text, often no more than a few paragraphs, that get copied and pasted all over the Internet. Copypasta might take the form of Internet memes, text from email forwards, or fun stories to share with friends.

Creepypasta, on the other hand, is copypasta’s evil mirror, the spookier version of terrifying tales that end on the creepiest note possible—their horror often enhanced by their brevity, their journal-style format, or their casual, “here’s a creepy thing that happened to me once” narrative style. Though many creepypasta are no more than a paragraph or two long, often the stories will span many updates and branch off into varying multimedia formats. The term Creepypasta itself has likewise expanded, becoming a catch-all phrase to describe the Internet’s most scary, weird, and terrifying phenomena.

Much like other urban legends, Creepypasta reveals modern anxiety over technology, especially in regards to media and forms of communication. These are often malignant sources of evil, much as they are in Japanese horror films like Pulse or Ringu. In some instances, your TV set can be the entity that can turn on you. In others it’s an old computer. Perhaps it’s a video game purchased under mysterious circumstances. Often it’s a single cursed file with no known origin, as if it came from the bowels of hell and not the bowels of the Internet.

Creepypasta also often reveals a sense of deep distortion of reality, the kind of just-slightly-off view of the world that only comes from the collective imagination of 4channers, Something Awful goons, redditors, and others who’ve found themselves glued to their computer at 3am reading about Mothman, Chupacabra, or other modern-day monsters. It seems inevitable, in retrospect, that out of the twisting labyrinth of the Internet, new legends would emerge, entirely fabricated but instantly occupying the status of mythos: a cave with terrifying secrets; a bizarre house that compels its victims to document their own horrifying ends; a normal, everyday photo of children on a playground—with one glaring oddity.
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