Posts tagged star wars

Without music, 'Star Wars' is super awkward

If you take Williams out of Star Wars, what are you left with?

Total awkwardness, as it happens.

Rodarte’s ‘Star Wars’ couture takes a trip to Skywalker Ranch

When Rodarte’s Star Wars-inspired gowns walked the runway in February, it was a science-fiction geek’s dream come true. 

The dresses were the start of more Star Wars appearances on the fashion runways and soon even celebrities were bringing the Death Star to the red carpet. You might think there is nothing more magical than seeing the classic series enter the high-fashion world, but you’d be wrong. It turns out seeing the dresses in the Star Wars world itself takes them to a whole new level.

[READ MORE]

'Star Wars' author talks about writing the first novel in Disney’s new canon
Today, as a new era begins for Star Wars storytelling, we speak to John Jackson Miller about the history, themes, and messages in his latest novel.
[Read the interview here]

'Star Wars' author talks about writing the first novel in Disney’s new canon

Today, as a new era begins for Star Wars storytelling, we speak to John Jackson Miller about the history, themes, and messages in his latest novel.

[Read the interview here]

These leaked pictures of Stormtrooper helmets are fucking awesome

Indierevolver.com shared the images online for the first time on Thursday. The first image is clearly for modernized version of a stock-issue Stormtrooper helmet. Consensus seems to be that the second image is an updated Snowtrooper helmet.

The helmet designs jive with the information that website Making Star Wars shared on June 17. They also mesh conceptually with what J.J. Abrams did with with the U.S.S. Enterprise in his Star Trek reboot. The new designs are modernized and slick, and their identities are unmistakable.

Between these images and the picture of Mark Hamill rocking the Jedi beard, this has been a damned good week for Star Wars fans.

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doctorscienceknowsfandom:

dailydot:

Shut up and take our money for this dancing Groot toy
If you’ve seen Guardians of the Galaxy (and let’s face it, at this point it feels like everyone has), then you may be shocked to discover that Disney and Marvel are not selling a ton of dancing Groot toys.
With no official version in sight, GotG fans are taking matters into their own hands.

My completely pull-out-of-my-butt theory about why Disney is leaving Dancing Groot money on the table:
Disney, as everyone knows, *owns* the girls-toy market. A big reason Disney bought Marvel was to move into the boys market.
Disney, like other toy hegemons, is taking a general toy-marketing strategy of stressing, emphasizing, and dare I say *creating* gender differences. Gender differentiation is what they are selling kids (and their parents): toys aren’t just for fun, they also work to reassure children & parents that the kids are gender-conforming.
Dancing Groot is too gender-neutral. Groot is referred to as “he” and is voiced/acted by Vin Diesel, but doesn’t really come across as necessarily masculine — and since few plants have separate sexes, the appropriate pronoun is probably “they” or “ze”, anyway.
More important for toy marketing, Dancing Groot doesn’t follow current color-coding for toy genders: ze is neither pink/purple (“for girls”) nor black with silver/red/blue accents (“for boys”). Dancing Groot is adorably cute (=”for girls”), but references Vin Diesel (=”for boys”).
TLDR: Dancing Groot cares nothing for you gender norms, so Disney/Marvel literally have no way to market it. I even think they’re *afraid* to.
Marvel, including GotG, is *supposed* to be For Boys — and in the hyper-conformist world of toy marketing, that means No Girls Allowed. If girls buy the toys, then boys (and their parents) won’t feel reassured about their masculine role-playing. That’s why there’s no kid-friendly Gamora merch — because if girls buy GotG merch, or even show up in the boy’s aisles (instead of the Pink Aisles where they belong), then obviously GotG merch is not a sign of boyhood, it would be just a toy. Dancing Groot would *also* be just a toy — and that’s not as profitable, or at least not as easy to market, as something that’s a toy and also a reinforcer of gender norms. Even having Dancing Groot (or Gamora) next to the other GotG merch would contaminate it, it would give the whole line the air of Not Necessarily Just For Boys.
Cooties, we used to call it.

This definitely isn’t the first time we’ve seen stringent gender norms at work in marketing for kids, and definitely not the first time Disney’s gendered marketing has angered our readers.

doctorscienceknowsfandom:

dailydot:

Shut up and take our money for this dancing Groot toy

If you’ve seen Guardians of the Galaxy (and let’s face it, at this point it feels like everyone has), then you may be shocked to discover that Disney and Marvel are not selling a ton of dancing Groot toys.

With no official version in sight, GotG fans are taking matters into their own hands.

My completely pull-out-of-my-butt theory about why Disney is leaving Dancing Groot money on the table:

Disney, as everyone knows, *owns* the girls-toy market. A big reason Disney bought Marvel was to move into the boys market.

Disney, like other toy hegemons, is taking a general toy-marketing strategy of stressing, emphasizing, and dare I say *creating* gender differences. Gender differentiation is what they are selling kids (and their parents): toys aren’t just for fun, they also work to reassure children & parents that the kids are gender-conforming.

Dancing Groot is too gender-neutral. Groot is referred to as “he” and is voiced/acted by Vin Diesel, but doesn’t really come across as necessarily masculine — and since few plants have separate sexes, the appropriate pronoun is probably “they” or “ze”, anyway.

More important for toy marketing, Dancing Groot doesn’t follow current color-coding for toy genders: ze is neither pink/purple (“for girls”) nor black with silver/red/blue accents (“for boys”). Dancing Groot is adorably cute (=”for girls”), but references Vin Diesel (=”for boys”).

TLDR: Dancing Groot cares nothing for you gender norms, so Disney/Marvel literally have no way to market it. I even think they’re *afraid* to.

Marvel, including GotG, is *supposed* to be For Boys — and in the hyper-conformist world of toy marketing, that means No Girls Allowed. If girls buy the toys, then boys (and their parents) won’t feel reassured about their masculine role-playing. That’s why there’s no kid-friendly Gamora merch — because if girls buy GotG merch, or even show up in the boy’s aisles (instead of the Pink Aisles where they belong), then obviously GotG merch is not a sign of boyhood, it would be just a toy. Dancing Groot would *also* be just a toy — and that’s not as profitable, or at least not as easy to market, as something that’s a toy and also a reinforcer of gender norms. Even having Dancing Groot (or Gamora) next to the other GotG merch would contaminate it, it would give the whole line the air of Not Necessarily Just For Boys.

Cooties, we used to call it.

This definitely isn’t the first time we’ve seen stringent gender norms at work in marketing for kids, and definitely not the first time Disney’s gendered marketing has angered our readers.

Princess Leia to star in one of three new ‘Star Wars’ comics

"The idea of seeing Leia kick ass just sounds right on the level of awesome."

Marvel is kicking off the return of Star Wars to the company with three new books focused on the original trilogy era.

Princess Leia to star in one of three new ‘Star Wars’ comics

"The idea of seeing Leia kick ass just sounds right on the level of awesome."

Marvel is kicking off the return of Star Wars to the company with three new books focused on the original trilogy era.

gameraboy:

Venerable concept artist Ralph McQuarrie, and some of his designs for Star Wars.