Posts tagged youtube

This a cappella ‘Wicked’ medley is witch-perfect
Because we knew Peter Hollens and Nick Pitera, we have been changed for good.

This a cappella ‘Wicked’ medley is witch-perfect

Because we knew Peter Hollens and Nick Pitera, we have been changed for good.

The Internet’s Own Boy knocked off YouTube temporarily by bogus copyright claim
Keeping with Swartz’s ideals of free flow of information, director Brian Knappenberger chose to make the film Creative Commons-licensed, meaning anyone can use the material without fear of copyright infringement.

The Internet’s Own Boy knocked off YouTube temporarily by bogus copyright claim

Keeping with Swartz’s ideals of free flow of information, director Brian Knappenberger chose to make the film Creative Commons-licensed, meaning anyone can use the material without fear of copyright infringement.

'Earth to Echo' is 'E.T.' for the YouTube generation

Earth to Echo is a film that knows its audience. The problem is that its audience, increasingly, needs a special reason to get off the Internet and come to the theater.

Much like VidCon, the half-industry, half-fandom convention celebrating YouTube culture where it got a special advance screening Friday night, Earth to Echo argues that the reason is pure and simple navel-gazing: You should watch Earth to Echo to celebrate yourself.

Earth to Echo has a premise that’s superficially very similar to J.J. Abrams’ sleeper hit Super 8: kids with cameras, strange occurrences in the desert, mysterious government conspiracies involving an alien with whom one of the kids soon forms a close connection. Both films wear their Spielberg homages on their sleeves, and both films weave their coming-of-age narratives into their depiction of the emerging filmmaker.

But where Super 8 concerns the individual growth of a single would-be independent filmmaker, Earth to Echo takes the fairly unusual tack of grounding itself in a community of friends who each have grown up with the Internet, specifically YouTube, as the backdrop to their somewhat isolated lives.

[READ MORE]

At the VidCon premiere, when asked his favorite thing about his character, Astro replied, “My favorite thing is that Tuck is black.”

*mic drop*

Inside the Vlogbrothers’ Enormous Family Tree
When Time named John Green to its Time 100 list earlier this year, actress Shailene Woodley, who plays the lead in the recent blockbuster film adaptation of Green’s young adult anthem The Fault in Our Stars, wrote his tribute. 
“He treats every human he meets as their own planet,” Woodley wrote, “rather than simply one of his moons.”
But what you may not know about Green is just how voluminous the planet that he and his brother Hank Green have created for themselves really is. Its orbit within popular and Internet culture is vast, and it exists in the galaxies of YouTube, publishing, and mainstream Hollywood culture simultaneously. 
At its center is a message of community, grassroots evolution, and hope.
….
Accio Harry Potter fanbase
LeakyCon, a mid-sized but ever-growing Harry Potter conference named after the popular HP news site Leaky Cauldron, may seem an unlikely conference to win annual recurring appearances from a major YouTube celebrity and one of the heavyweights of YA publishing. But no story of the Green brothers is complete without it—or without the Harry Potter fandom.

Hank Green dressed as the Tenth Doctor at LeakyCon 2012
Photo via Leaky Con
In 2007, the Harry Potter fandom was waning as fans prepared for the release of the seventh and final book and the end of an iconic era of fandom history. For most of its lifetime, HP fandom had centered around discussions of the books and related fan activities: cosplay, fanfic, and real life cons focused around the books. But in later years, anew flavor of HP fandom had emerged: sub-fandoms within the fandom. Wizard rock (“wrock”) had taken off as a new genre of music requiring love for Harry first, talent second. Bands with name like Harry and the Potters, Draco and the Malfoys, The Weird Sisters, and The Remus Lupins were going on tours and amassing large crowds of fans. 
Around the same time, John Green had just taken home the prestigious Printz award for his 2005 debut YA novel, Looking For Alaska. His brother, then-27-year-old Hank Green, was putting his degrees in biochemistry and environmental studies to good use as the editor of Eco Geek and as a noted environmental science writer. In between writing to change the world, the brothers starting sending video messages to each other every day for the duration of 2007, in a project they called “Brotherhood 2.0,” on the Vlogbrothers channel. 
[READ MORE]
Have you ever wondered how the Green brothers became integral parts of YouTube, Tumblr, and fandom?
We map it out for you in an extensive look back at seven years of being awesome.

Inside the Vlogbrothers’ Enormous Family Tree

When Time named John Green to its Time 100 list earlier this year, actress Shailene Woodley, who plays the lead in the recent blockbuster film adaptation of Green’s young adult anthem The Fault in Our Stars, wrote his tribute. 

“He treats every human he meets as their own planet,” Woodley wrote, “rather than simply one of his moons.”

But what you may not know about Green is just how voluminous the planet that he and his brother Hank Green have created for themselves really is. Its orbit within popular and Internet culture is vast, and it exists in the galaxies of YouTube, publishing, and mainstream Hollywood culture simultaneously. 

At its center is a message of community, grassroots evolution, and hope.

….

Accio Harry Potter fanbase

LeakyCon, a mid-sized but ever-growing Harry Potter conference named after the popular HP news site Leaky Cauldron, may seem an unlikely conference to win annual recurring appearances from a major YouTube celebrity and one of the heavyweights of YA publishing. But no story of the Green brothers is complete without it—or without the Harry Potter fandom.

Hank Green dressed as the Tenth Doctor at LeakyCon 2012

Photo via Leaky Con

In 2007, the Harry Potter fandom was waning as fans prepared for the release of the seventh and final book and the end of an iconic era of fandom history. For most of its lifetime, HP fandom had centered around discussions of the books and related fan activities: cosplay, fanfic, and real life cons focused around the books. But in later years, anew flavor of HP fandom had emerged: sub-fandoms within the fandom. Wizard rock (“wrock”) had taken off as a new genre of music requiring love for Harry first, talent second. Bands with name like Harry and the Potters, Draco and the Malfoys, The Weird Sisters, and The Remus Lupins were going on tours and amassing large crowds of fans. 

Around the same time, John Green had just taken home the prestigious Printz award for his 2005 debut YA novel, Looking For Alaska. His brother, then-27-year-old Hank Green, was putting his degrees in biochemistry and environmental studies to good use as the editor of Eco Geek and as a noted environmental science writer. In between writing to change the world, the brothers starting sending video messages to each other every day for the duration of 2007, in a project they called “Brotherhood 2.0,” on the Vlogbrothers channel.

[READ MORE]

Have you ever wondered how the Green brothers became integral parts of YouTube, Tumblr, and fandom?

We map it out for you in an extensive look back at seven years of being awesome.

A John Green Q&A is coming soon to a laptop near you

On Thursday, May 22, Austin’s Alamo Drafthouse and Forever Fest are presenting a special preview screening of the heartbreaking YA novel-turned-Shailene Woodley outlet. The screenings will be held at a dozen Drafthouse theatres across the nation—six in Texas, two in Virginia, and one each in Missouri, Colorado, New York, and Michigan. After the screening, author John Green and director Josh Boone will be joined by Forever Fest cofounders Brandy Fons and Sarah Pitre for a Q&A about the film.

They’ll be appearing live in Austin, but the Q&A will be simulcast to the other 11 Drafthouse locations beginning at 9:15pm ET. If you don’t live in one of those cities, however—or if you didn’t RSVP in time to reserve a spot in Austin—don’t fret. The whole thing will also be streaming on the Popsugar Girls’ Guide to YouTube channel; tune in there to catch all 30 minutes of Boone and Green talking about Hazel and Gus with two of the most dedicated YA aficionados west of the Mississippi.

[READ MORE]

VidCon says it will have an anti-harassment policy in place this year

Every convention needs a strong stance against sexual harassment in con spaces. So where is VidCon’s?

Following the sexual harassment allegations leveled against DFTBA stars Alex Day and Tom Milsom back in March, DFTBA co-founder Hank Green announced that he would be organizing a Task Force to help prevent similar cases in the future.

The Green brothers are the founders of VidCon, the first and biggest convention dedicated to the YouTube vlogging and creative community. So drawing up a code of conduct for VidCon seems like a pretty simple step towards achieving the goal of prevention.

The Daily Dot reached out to VidCon to clarify whether they had plans to implement any kind of harassment policy, and received a positive reply:

“VidCon has always planned on disseminating and enforcing an official code of conduct policy prior to the execution of this year’s event.”

[READ MORE]

Teen Vine stars Nash Grier and Cameron Dallas are getting their own movie

That sustained squealing you might have heard over the last day is the sound of teenage girls across America celebrating the news that Nash Grier and Cameron Dallas are getting their own movie.

Grier and Dallas, two Vine stars with a combined following of more than 11 million, will be partnering with AwesomenessTV for the upcoming film. AwesomenessTV, a channel focused on teen-created content, was acquired by DreamWorks last May, which opened it up to a whole new audience outside of YouTube. In a statement, Awesomeness CEO and executive producer Brian Robbins said a film is “a natural next step for them. They already have a dedicated fan base.”

[READ MORE]

(Let’s just hope the movie doesn’t contain any of their dubious advice for girls on how to be attractive.)

They say the fastest way to a woman’s heart is to violently flip, flail, and spasm mere inches from her face.

No longer do girls in this country have the right to walk to class, enjoy a quick bite, or simply sit without their personal space being assaulted by a guy who never made it past the audition rounds of Ninja Warrior.

Huey, Dewey, and Louie, the main characters of the animated Disney television show DuckTales, were young triplets with quacky, high-pitched voices. They did not wear pants. If there is a hierarchy of animated characters from sexiest to least sexy, the DuckTales trio are not high on that list (nor is their miserly great-uncle Scrooge McDuck, although at least he’s an adult).

Yet the DuckTales theme song, as it turns out, might be something you want to turn up while pouring your sweetie a glass of champagne—at least this oddly sensual cover by POW!GRL and ScottBradleeLovesYa. Tell me you don’t want to shake a tail feather.

[Who knew the ‘DuckTales’ theme song was actually a slow jam all along?]